Trafficking/Prostitution

About

Survivors Connect international online trafficking prostitution survivor network

This blog is a composite of writings and referrals to blog posts written by survivors of prostitution/trafficking.  It’s a place to find the writings of members of Survivors Connect, the International Online Leaderless Network of Trafficking/Prostitution Survivors.  When we act together it is much easier for us to speak the truth about the sex industry.    We no longer have to do it alone.  If we join voices, we’re stronger and harder to ignore.  It’s time for us to lead the anti-CSE movement and speak for ourselves. Here’s what survivors have to say:

They kept me vulnerable with other girls who barely spoke English, but our tears of both sadness and hope became our new language.  — Chong Kim

I think we will push an open door if we speak the reality of prostitution, especially if we focus on it being a human rights issue first and foremost.  It is so important that we start striking out on our own, not always waiting for the movement to catch up with our passion and the urgent need for survivors to have some leadership.   Rebecca Mott

Together we are stronger. It is so easy to feel hopeless and overwhelmed with it all on your own.   Angel K

We are leaders in our own right.  Our voices have power.  We’re strong and smart and we’re here for each other.   Nothing will break the ties between us.  We protect each other.

Our network is the opposite of exploitation.  There’s no leader and everyone has equal rank.  We vote to decide what we do as a group.  Everything we contribute to this network belongs to us alone.  We are in control at last.

We’d love it if you’d join us.  If you’re interested please email Stella Marr or Aashika Damodar and tell us a bit about yourself and provide a phone number (if possible).  We screen so no pimps or johns can get into our network.  We can’t wait to meet you.

In sisterhood and love,

Stella Marr & Aashika Damodar

This network was inspired by all the survivors we’ve known and the bold and courageous Aboriginal Women’s Action Network.

  1. I wanted to say thank you for following me. I tried to read some of the poetry on your page but I have very extreme PTSD from sexual assault and domestic abuse. One of the poems gave me a very bad attack my service dog had to assist me with. I want you to know I really appreciate that you have this outlet to talk about this suffering. Thank you for supporting mine as well as I recover.

    Sincerely
    KMDB and Penny Lu my PTSD Psychiatric Service Dog.

    PS It says no responses but I couldn’t find an email to email you personally otherwise I would have.

    • I’m so sad you’ve been through such terrible things. I’m sorry about your flashbacks. I’m so glad to hear about Penny Lu.

      I’d love to know more about how you were connected with a service dog for PTSD. I just think that’s wonderful, and I’d love to be able to tell other survivors how to go about it.

      Sending you so much love always, xoxoxo

      • No it’s not your fault don’t worry. I really was interested or I wouldn’t have risked it. Penny was a dog that I got as a puppy and learned to train myself, I train horses and have trained hunting dogs. I don’t know of any connections in Europe, but the following might help:

        http://www.iaadp.org/psd_tasks.html
        dogwish.org/ServiceDogs_PTSD.html
        http://www.Until-Tuesday.com

        I met a man who was writing a book about his PTSD service dog he received after suffering trauma in Iraq, he pretty much guided me through the rest of the process.

        I hope this helps. Penny took 2 years to train, she’s not “perfect” but she meets the needs that I need her for, I am looking for a new dog this year but haven’t decided between my breeds but it will be another setter.

        Also you do not need to “register” a service dog, there are companies out there ripping people off. So they have to be careful. And you need to be strong, and we as women who have been through sexual trauma usually have a problem with confrontation if our dogs are rejected. Someone else should be there to offer confidence and support in the beginning and you should always have a copy of service dog laws on you.

        If you really want I could maybe do a guest blog about it in the future, or I could do a youtube video and share it with you of explaining what exactly it is that Penny does for me. We are doing a youtube channel in the future about our travels through the world so that might be an option to be offered as well.

        You can find Luis Carlos Montalvan’s book Until Tuesday at any major book seller. It is also now offered in paperback at a reduced cost as of last week.

        Thank you for the reply
        KMDB & Penny Lu

      • Thank you so much for all that useful information. I’m going to read Until Tuesday. I love the idea of both the guest blog and the youtube video. I’m going to read Until Tuesday.

        Wishing you and Penny Lu a gorgeous day.

        WIth so much love,

        Stella

  2. This is really needed. Survivors connecting, and having leadership. Love and sisterhood, even with some differences of opinion…or maybe not as big of differences as we might think? Who knows. In any case I am glad to have found you all.

  3. I mentioned your blog on my blog because I think your message is important.

  4. This is so great! You are all extremely inspiring and loved. Thank you for what you do.

    http://stepstochangetheworld.wordpress.com/

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